Choosing the Correct Grip: Eastern Grip

 

choosing-the-Correct-Grip- Eastern-Grip

In the world of tennis racket grips, the eastern grip used to be an extremely popular one. However, it has since declined in popularity over time. However, it still ranks highly as one of the four most common grips that recreational and professional players use. Here we will take a look at what the eastern grip is and what functions it serves on the court.

 

What is this grip?

 

The eastern grip is a natural transition from the convention grip and can be played interchangeably. It is less extreme than other grips, making it an ideal one to keep coming back to for more neutral hits. As this is a forehand grip, the eastern grip can be played in quite a competitive and aggressive manner.

 

How to hold this grip?

 

The hold of the eastern grip is relatively simple, compared to its more extreme counterparts. To form the grip of an eastern grip, you simply need to place the palm side of your index finger against the middle of the racket. From here, the fingers need to be wrapped around the racket to form a firm grasp.

 

The eastern grip is ideal for beginners as it is quite a natural and simple way to place the hand around the racket. Because of this, it tends to be the first grip that beginners are taught before moving onto other grips such as the western or semi-western.

 

What are the benefits of this grip?

 

The main benefit of this grip is that it is closely related to the continental grip and can be used in an easy transition from one to the other. This grip also allows players to move from a forehand to a volley quite seamlessly.

 

Also, when returning a serve, the eastern grip allows a quick transition to a forehand or backhand return. In terms of actually hitting the ball, the eastern grip gives players a chance for a flat hit, making passing shots easy.

 

What are the drawbacks of this grip?

 

The main downfall to an eastern grip is that it doesn’t generate a wide range of topspin. This can it harder to maintain a consistent rhythm in the return shots. Nonetheless, the eastern grip is a staple in tennis and something that all players use at one point or another, but it should not be relied on for the most aggressive shots or returns.